The Singing Kettle

35 – First appearance of The Singing Kettle

1982

IF they were a stick of rock, The Singing Kettle would have “Scotland” running slap bang through the middle.

For generations of kids, a visit to see their chaotic antics was a rite of passage.

Over the years the colourful creation of husband and wife singers Artie Trezise and Cilla Fisher played to five million people worldwide.

Cilla Fisher, Artie Trezise and Gary Coupland, the three original members of The Singing Kettle, received MBEs in 1999
Cilla Fisher, Artie Trezise and Gary Coupland, the three original members of The Singing Kettle, received MBEs in 1999

And, fittingly, the early days were colourfully madcap. Scots to the core though the kids’ songs were, it was a bit of a case of “Yanks for the memories” for the duo from Kingskettle in Fife.

Like Billy Connolly they’d toiled long and hard on the folk circuit before they found fame.

So they combined traditional Scots rhymes with music remembered from tours of America.

Their first kids’ album easily outsold everything they’d done before.

Playgroup visits and a Dalkeith library debut became big theatres and TV fame.

Every act needs to stand out and their big bright kettles – hand-painted in a frantic through-the-night session – and their famous rhyme became their stand-out thing.

It was Cilla’s idea to have to spout some magic words to get into the kettles and after they did it once, they just had to it again. And again.

In fact, before calling it quits earlier this year they reckoned they’d said it 47,000 times over more than three decades.

So, come on then, all together now – “Spout, handle, lid of metal, what’s inside the singing kettle?”